Throwing Aids

The treatment of throwing aids by all rule sets is similar, with Borges based rules being more specific.  The one major difference is that gloves cannot be worn in stone events under Borges based rules.

Borges Based Rules:

No device of any kind (e.g. weightlifting straps) that in any way assists a competitor when making a throw shall be allowed. Only the following are excepted:

  1. The use of tape on the wrist, hand, and fingers is allowed, however the taping together of two or more fingers is forbidden. Any use of tape to protect the hands and fingers should be cleared with the judge before the event starts.
  2. The use of gloves is allowed in all events except for the stone putts.
  3. In order to obtain a better grip, competitors may use a suitable substance on their hands (or gloves) only. In the stone putts, a suitable substance may also be applied to the neck area.
  4. The use of toe spikes for the hammer throw is allowed.
  5. The use of weightlifting belts and supportive wraps is allowed.

NASGA Based Rules (MASA and RMSA)

Individual fingers or the thumb of the throwing hand may be taped but the fingers or thumb will not be taped together. No straps or other devices besides a glove will be used to aid the competitor in holding the implement. No footwear that may aid in increasing the athlete’s height will be used in the events thrown for height.

USAD Rules:

  • Gloves may be worn. However, hammer gloves or any other gloves with straps that can aid in the competitors grip or somehow give the competitor an unfair advantage are not allowed.
  • The use of toe spikes for the hammer throw is allowed.
  • The use of weightlifting belts and supportive wraps is allowed.
  • Individual fingers and the thumb of the throwing hand maybe taped, but no fingers or thumb maybe taped together.

Spray verses Pine Tar Tacky

Pine tar tacky is the norm in Heavy Athletics. Spray and pine tar tacky do not play well together, which could raise some safety concerns.

    • Spray tacky when applied to a hammer handle with pine tar tacky acts like a solvent, making that handle greasy and slick.  If spray tacky is used by a thrower, it should be applied to hand or glove;  and applied long enough prior to athletes turn for the tacky to set up, thus avoiding its solvent properties.
    • As a judge, you should consider what you will do if some one wants to use spray tacky. At the very least, it should NEVER be applied to the handle.

Wire Hammer Gloves

Wire hammer throwers claim that the flap across the palm does not help the grip.  Many Hammer GloveHighland Game throwers think other wise. USAD rules expressly band the use of those gloves.

Some ADs allow the glove if the thrower has not cut the horizontal seams, turning the (tan) pad into a flap.  Other ADs out right ban them under “Individual fingers and the thumb of the throwing hand maybe taped, but no fingers or thumb maybe taped together.” and the (tan) pad allows the fingers to somewhat work together.

Comments

As a Judge, I do not allow any substances to be applied to implements (other than Hammers and even then, the tacky should be applied to the hand not the handle) as it can leave a mess for the next thrower and slows down the competition as the next thrower may need to clean the implement.

Example: A weak gripped throwers who applies tacky to the his glove or steel ring for weight- for-distance events.  The next person who follows this wimp gripped thrower has to deal with his mess or face having his release screwed up by the sticky mess.